Posted in competitions, critique, literary festival, writing

BeaconLit Third Year 500-word comp Round 4 – Dec 2019 winners announced

We are delighted to announce the top three stories from December’s entries are (in alphabetical order):

  • Blessed are the Peacemakers
  • My Nemesis
  • Univited Guest

The theme for December was ‘a reunion’. The three top stories will now go through to the final judging and the top ten prize-winning authors (not necessarily the same as the top ten stories as no author can win more than one prize) will be announced at the 2020 BeaconLit literary festival on Saturday 11th July. As with most months, there were more than three stories that could have made the top three but those that did were either closer to the theme or stronger (provoked more of a reaction after reading) so don’t be disheartened if yours hasn’t been mentioned.

If your story for this month isn’t listed in the above three, you are welcome to do whatever you like with your submission hereon in. If your story is listed, it’s possible that it could be placed in the ultimate top ten* which will be published on this website (and on http://www.beaconlit.co.uk) next July so please do not send it elsewhere until after the literary festival.

If you have requested, and paid for, critique, this will be with you in the next few days.

*

Gareth’s feedback on the stories received this month:

Several good stories written as if from personal knowledge, really getting inside the characters in a short space. Lots of capable handling of dialogue. And it’s good to see writers using (where appropriate) crisp, short sentences. It’s worth trying to make your point with as few words, as this form is all about brevity.

The stories were competent and satisfying. Several saved a neat twist, heavily disguised, to the very end. It’s good to be surprised in a story, but not essential. Others tell a very conventional story, in strict temporal order. But as long as you do it well, and retain the reader’s interest, that is all that matters.

*

Although Gareth judges on the impact of the stories and the quality of the writing, it’s always disappointing when there are simple spelling mistakes or even simpler errors that should have been picked up during the editing process. Please do read your stories carefully before submitting and ideally show them to someone you trust for their opinion.

*Should you get through to the longlist of 27 stories (three per month over nine months), it doesn’t necessarily mean that your story won’t be chosen if it slips out of the top ten. No author will appear in the top ten twice so a story that came eleventh (or twelfth, thirteenth…) could be bumped up where there are author duplications.

And now you can also receive feedback on your story / stories at £5 per story with the optional critique service (given by the judge, Gareth Davies). This option is detailed on the main 500-word Competition page with an option to select critique within the entry form.

N.B. All the profits from this competition go to BeaconLit funds for the local libraries. No one involved in the competition charges for their time (including the judge!). Good luck!

Posted in competitions, writing

BeaconLit’s 500-word comp is open for January

Hello everyone. Yes, December’s theme of ‘a reunion’ has closed and January’s competition is now open. The theme is ‘sweet and sour’, to be used in any way you would like. Rules, prizes, entry form etc. via https://beaconlitblog.wordpress.com/500-word-competition.

NB. If you have stories ready for future themes, please don’t submit them until the relevant month as the entry will be disqualified with no refund given, and you won’t be able to submit it in the correct month (because we will have seen it). It’s rule number four. 🙂

Posted in competitions, critique, literary festival, writing

BeaconLit Third Year 500-word comp Round 3 – Nov 2019 winners announced

Sorry for being late but we are delighted to announce the top three stories from November’s entries are (in alphabetical order):

  • Discharged
  • The Fifth Conversation
  • Where the Train Will Divide

The theme for November was ‘the fifth’. The three top stories will now go through to the final judging and the top ten prize-winning authors (not necessarily the same as the top ten stories as no author can win more than one prize) will be announced at the 2020 BeaconLit literary festival on Saturday 11th July. As with most months, there were more than three stories that could have made the top three but those that did were either closer to the theme or stronger (provoked more of a reaction after reading) so don’t be disheartened if yours hasn’t been mentioned.

If your story for this month isn’t listed in the above three, you are welcome to do whatever you like with your submission hereon in. If your story is listed, it’s possible that it could be placed in the ultimate top ten* which will be published on this website (and on http://www.beaconlit.co.uk) next July so please do not send it elsewhere until after the literary festival.

If you have requested, and paid for, critique, this will be with you in the next few days.

*

Gareth’s feedback on the stories received this month:

Some particularly clever stories this month, well crafted without any need for me to make pedantic but sometimes necessary comments about over-use of exclamation marks and punctuation confusion. Every one could have been a winner. My job was very difficult.

In the stories that didn’t ask for a critique, I particularly liked the the depiction of a big communal event, a fireworks display, from two different points of view – that of a young child and an old soldier. (I’ve often thought that the loud fireworks that resound over every community in the land are in poor taste, so close to Armistice Day. And a short story can make the point where a pompous opinion piece in a newspaper cannot.)

In another story the action is tangential to something enormous happening. So we are given the procedure of a school lock down and the hiding in a cupboard. We don’t know what happens in the end, but a short story of this length can be excused for leaving things open. There’s not always room for a conclusion, satisfactory or not, so no need to force one, as this writers does not.

There’s no real message in this story (there doesn’t have to be), except that of the child’s complete faith in the counsellor.

Then there is a good ‘Appearances can be deceptive’ story, set on a train.

I don’t really have any comments on style or choice of language. I’ll make one point about the need for variety, wherever possible. You only have 500 words. Might as well make the key ones different  where you can, or not too similar.

An example is the writer of another story using “splash” and “sploshing”. Both mean more or less the same, despite the one letter difference. In a short story I would avoid using both, when there are plenty of alternatives. Faced with a choice I would retain “sploshing” as it is the more unusual, and has an active, urgent feel to it.

*

Although Gareth judges on the impact of the stories and the quality of the writing, it’s always disappointing when there are simple spelling mistakes or even simpler errors that should have been picked up during the editing process. Please do read your stories carefully before submitting and ideally show them to someone you trust for their opinion.

*Should you get through to the longlist of 27 stories (three per month over nine months), it doesn’t necessarily mean that your story won’t be chosen if it slips out of the top ten. No author will appear in the top ten twice so a story that came eleventh (or twelfth, thirteenth…) could be bumped up where there are author duplications.

And now you can also receive feedback on your story / stories at £5 per story with the optional critique service (given by the judge, Gareth Davies). This option is detailed on the main 500-word Competition page with an option to select critique within the entry form.

N.B. All the profits from this competition go to BeaconLit funds for the local libraries. No one involved in the competition charges for their time (including the judge!). Good luck!

Posted in competitions, writing

BeaconLit’s 500-word comp is open for December

Hello everyone. Yes, November’s theme of ‘the fifth’ has closed and December’s competition is now open. The theme is ‘a reunion’, to be used in any way you would like. Rules, prizes, entry form etc. via https://beaconlitblog.wordpress.com/500-word-competition.

NB. If you have stories ready for future themes, please don’t submit them until the relevant month as the entry will be disqualified with no refund given, and you won’t be able to submit it in the correct month (because we will have seen it). It’s rule number four. 🙂

Posted in competitions, critique, literary festival, writing

BeaconLit Third Year 500-word comp Round 2 – Oct 2019 winners announced

We are delighted to announce the top three stories from October’s entries are (in alphabetical order):

  • Adult Behaviour
  • A Sticky End
  • Time to Speak Out

The three top stories will now go through to the final judging and the top ten prize-winning authors (not necessarily the same as the top ten stories as no author can win more than one prize) will be announced at the 2020 BeaconLit literary festival on Saturday 11th July. As with most months, there were more than three stories that could have made the top three but those that did were either closer to the theme or stronger (provoked more of a reaction after reading) so don’t be disheartened if yours hasn’t been mentioned.

If your story for this month isn’t listed in the above three, you are welcome to do whatever you like with your submission hereon in. If your story is listed, it’s possible that it could be placed in the ultimate top ten* which will be published on this website (and on http://www.beaconlit.co.uk) next July so please do not send it elsewhere until after the literary festival.

If you have requested, and paid for, critique, this will be with you in the next few days.

*

Gareth’s feedback on the stories received this month:

Again, I liked all eight entries this month, written to the theme of ‘sweet revenge’,  but in the end I chose Adult Behaviour, A Sticky End and Time to Speak Out as my winners. But every one was a contender.

There was ambiguity in some (nothing wrong with that) – did that errant husband even survive the meal?  – but not the confusion I sometimes experienced last month.

Characters were well established in such a short space. And flashbacks, where used, I could understand – ie I knew we were going back to the start of the story, with it being spelt out.

People seem to have taken the point about using exclamation marks excessively. I only counted a few. And they were justified.

But people were still continuing a sentence, when they could easily put in a full stop  and start a fresh sentence, instead of running on.  People write succinctly in other ways; if they cut sentence up, it would make their points quicker, and with more impact.

*

Although Gareth judges on the impact of the stories and the quality of the writing, it’s always disappointing when there are simple spelling mistakes or even simpler errors that should have been picked up during the editing process. Please do read your stories carefully before submitting and ideally show them to someone you trust for their opinion.

*Should you get through to the longlist of 27 stories (three per month over nine months), it doesn’t necessarily mean that your story won’t be chosen if it slips out of the top ten. No author will appear in the top ten twice so a story that came eleventh (or twelfth, thirteenth…) could be bumped up where there are author duplications.

And now you can also receive feedback on your story / stories at £5 per story with the optional critique service (given by the judge, Gareth Davies). This option is detailed on the main 500-word Competition page with an option to select critique within the entry form.

N.B. All the profits from this competition go to BeaconLit funds for the local libraries. No one involved in the competition charges for their time (including the judge!). Good luck!

Posted in competitions, writing

BeaconLit’s 500-word comp is open for November

Hello everyone. Yes, October’s theme of ‘sweet revenge’ has closed and November’s competition is now open. The theme is ‘the fifth’, to be used in any way you would like. Rules, prizes, entry form etc. via https://beaconlitblog.wordpress.com/500-word-competition.

NB. If you have stories ready for future themes, please don’t submit them until the relevant month as the entry will be disqualified with no refund given, and you won’t be able to submit it in the correct month (because we will have seen it). It’s rule number four. 🙂

Posted in competitions, critique, literary festival, writing

BeaconLit Third Year 500-word comp Round 1 – Sept 2019 winners announced

We are delighted to announce the top three stories from September’s entries are (in alphabetical order):

  • Future Plans
  • The Recent Convert
  • The Trial

These stories will now go through to the final judging and the top ten prize-winning authors (not necessarily the same as the top ten stories as no author can win more than one prize) will be announced at the 2020 BeaconLit literary festival on Saturday 11th July. There are often stories that could have made the top selected but those that did were either closer to the theme or stronger (provoked more of a reaction after reading) so don’t be disheartened if yours hasn’t been mentioned.

If your story for this month isn’t listed above, you are welcome to do whatever you like with your submission hereon in. If your story is listed, it’s possible that it could be placed in the ultimate top ten* which will be published on this website (and on http://www.beaconlit.co.uk) next July so please do not send it elsewhere until after the literary festival.

If you have requested, and paid for, critique, this will be with you in the next few days.

*

Gareth’s feedback on the stories received this month:

There were good things about all seven of the entries this month, but in the end I chose Future Plans, The Recent Convert, and The Trial as my winners.

In several of the other entries I occasionally found myself confused, with the part played by some characters in my opinion too ambiguous. Mystery is one thing, but I was left unsure.

However, the standard was high.

The comments I would make, about those who did not ask for a critique, and some who did, is that some people still use exclamation marks excessively. Generally the exclamation is implicit in what you say, and doesn’t have to be “underlined” like this. If they hadn’t been used at all, I would not have thought there was something missing.

Another point is sometimes people continue a sentence when they could easily put in a full stop and start a fresh sentence, instead of running on. Often this strengthens what they’re trying to say anyway.

I also suggest that people try to be more succinct where possible – after all you only have 500 words and if you can trim one or two here and there it’s all to the good.

Some caught my eye such as: “thrusts herself into”. Why not “throws on” [clothing]?

And “sees her chance” works just as well as “seizes her opportunity”.

My final point is the use of “that” instead of “which”, or vice versa. I, too, often have to check, but in essence it’s “that” if it is essential extra information, without which the line doesn’t make sense. And “which” if you could take the words following without losing any meaning.

*

Although our judges choose their favourite stories on the impact of the stories and the quality of the writing, it’s always disappointing when there are simple spelling mistakes or even simpler errors that should have been picked up during the editing process. Please do read your stories carefully before submitting and ideally show them to someone you trust for their opinion.

*Should you get through to the longlist of 27 stories (three per month over nine months), it doesn’t necessarily mean that your story won’t be chosen if it slips out of the top ten. No author will appear in the top ten twice so a story that came eleventh (or twelfth, thirteenth…) could be bumped up where there are author duplications.

You can also receive feedback on your story / stories at £5 per story with the optional critique service (given by the current judge, journalist and writer Gareth Davis). This option is detailed on the main 500-word Competition page, where you can also find the forthcoming themes, with an option to select critique within the entry form.

N.B. All the money from this competition goes to BeaconLit funds for the local libraries. Our judges do not charge for their time. Good luck!