Posted in competitions, writing

BeaconLit’s 500-word comp is open for April

Hello everyone. Yes, March’s theme of ‘The Insider’ has closed and April’s is now live. The theme is ‘No Fool Like A…’, to be used in any way you would like within the 500-word maximum. Rules, prizes, entry form etc. via https://beaconlitblog.wordpress.com/500-word-competition.

The results for February’s competition will be announced shortly.

NB. If you have stories ready for future themes, please don’t submit them until the relevant month as the entry will be disqualified with no refund given, and you won’t be able to submit it in the correct month (because we will have seen it). It’s rule number four. 🙂

Posted in competitions, writing

BeaconLit’s 500-word comp is open for March

Hello everyone. Yes, February’s theme of ‘Better to Have Loved and Lost’ has closed and March’s is now live. The theme is ‘The Insider’, to be used in any way you would like within the 500-word maximum. Rules, prizes, entry form etc. via https://beaconlitblog.wordpress.com/500-word-competition.

NB. If you have stories ready for future themes, please don’t submit them until the relevant month as the entry will be disqualified with no refund given, and you won’t be able to submit it in the correct month (because we will have seen it). It’s rule number four. 🙂

Posted in competitions, critique, literary festival, writing

BeaconLit Fourth Year 500-word comp Round 6 – Jan 2021 winners announced

We are delighted to announce the top three stories from January’s entries are (in alphabetical order):

  • Did you have a good holiday?
  • Piece by Piece
  • The Real Mrs Chapman

January’s theme was ‘A New Me’. The three top stories will now go through to the final judging and the top ten prize-winning authors (not necessarily the same as the top ten stories as no author can win more than one prize) will be announced at the 2021 BeaconLit literary festival on Saturday 10th July (fingers crossed!). The results will also be listed here and on the main website (link below) and the winners contacted.

There are often more than three stories that could have made the top three but those that did were either closer to the theme or stronger (provoked more of a reaction after reading) so don’t be disheartened if yours hasn’t been mentioned.

If your story for this month isn’t listed in the above three, you are welcome to do whatever you like with your submission hereon in. If your story is listed, it’s possible that it could be placed in the ultimate top ten* which will be published on this website (and on http://www.beaconlit.co.uk) in July so please do not send it elsewhere until after the final results are announced.

If you have requested, and paid for, critique, this will be with you in the next few days if not already.

*

Gareth’s feedback on the stories received this month:

There were some thoughtful interpretations, ranging from facial and even full body makeovers, to dropping out of, or into, lives of crime. Surprisingly only one person chose the ongoing pandemic lockdown as the backdrop. Some stories were rooted in the practical and real-life experience, both in the classroom, as teachers (with scarily well-observed pupils). One teacher, helped by her therapist, was finding a new way to negotiate the class, and making clever use of a banana at a key point in the story. As well as clapping for carers, we should be cheering for teachers once a week.

People are taking on difficult subjects. One was a touching story about a boy applying make-up, confidently redefining his sexuality, with a neat twist in the last paragraph. Another person struggles with contact lenses, an important part of the makeover.

Another writer outlines the practical details of her going-green plan, complete with making donations to green charities.

Lockdown can still be a fertile subject, and we all have something to say about our domestic situation. One person told a very good jigsaw story, for instance. And clearly based on the person’s own experience, with lots of practical detail on how to deal with those 2000 thousand pieces, while coming to terms with one’s partner.

One or two ventured into science fiction. When you imagine the future, of course, anything goes. But in other real-life locations, it’s always worth checking the details online. If you have a plausible story why spoil it by introducing a jarring plot detail?

Quite a number of good stories, and I urge people not to be discouraged if they weren’t in my top three. I could easily have put another three there. Please keep trying.

Some general observations…

It’s tempting to be lyrical and pile on the adjectives. But do be self-critical. Look again and see if you can cast that sentence more simply, while keeping the strong adjectives. Or maybe just one vivid piece of description to set the scene. You’ve made your point about that stunning landscape, or sunset. Now get on with this story.

The wonderful thing about writing on a computer (or phone or iPad) is you never need to misspell again. I came across one or two wrong spellings, and they can be rather jarring. Do check.

And watch out for cliches. Think of new ways to describe the person serving you coffee, and the effect it has on you. Think: has what I’ve just written been said before in this way 1 million times, with these same qualifying adjectives? If the answer is yes, spend some time thinking of a new way to say it.

A simple comma can make all the difference. Amplifying a clause, when, if a sentence simply runs on unbroken, readers could be left confused. Again, no end of trustworthy help on the Internet. And do read pieces through yet one more time to pick up those stray words or letters that get overlooked and stranded in a piece of copy, as you edit.

Several people repeated the same word, or a variation upon it, in successive sentences. It is worth looking for alternatives,.

And when to use capital letters? New Year, for example, generally has initial capitals.

If in doubt, do check on a few different places on the Internet. There will be an authoritative answer there.

My feeling is that technical terms, such as DEFCON 3, need to be explained in a story. I had to look it up. I am obviously watching the wrong films.

*

Although Gareth judges on the impact of the stories and the quality of the writing, it’s always disappointing when there are simple spelling mistakes or even simpler errors that should have been picked up during the editing process. Please do read your stories carefully before submitting and ideally show them to someone you trust for their opinion.

*Should you get through to the longlist of 30 stories (three per month over ten months), it doesn’t necessarily mean that your story won’t be chosen if it slips out of the top ten. No author will appear in the top ten twice so a story that came eleventh (or twelfth, thirteenth…) could be bumped up where there are author duplications.

You can also receive feedback on your story / stories at £5 per story with the optional critique service (given by the judge, Gareth Davies). This option is detailed on the main 500-word Competition page with an option to select critique within the entry form.

N.B. ALL the profits (fees minus PayPal charges) from this competition go to BeaconLit funds for the local libraries. No one involved in the competition charges for their time (including the judge!). Good luck!

Posted in competitions, critique, literary festival, writing

BeaconLit Fourth Year 500-word comp Round 5 – Dec 2020 winners announced (and February’s open!)

On the day that January rolls over to February (Theme: Better To Have Loved And Lost), we are delighted to announce the top three stories from December’s entries are (in alphabetical order):

  • Big Black Boots with High Cotton Tops
  • Black and Red Promises
  • Party Boy

The theme for December was ‘The Fake Santa’. The three top stories will now go through to the final judging and the top ten prize-winning authors (not necessarily the same as the top ten stories as no author can win more than one prize) will be announced at the 2021 BeaconLit literary festival on Saturday 10th July (fingers crossed!). The results will also be listed here and on the main website (link below) and the winners contacted.

There are often more than three stories that could have made the top three but those that did were either closer to the theme or stronger (provoked more of a reaction after reading) so don’t be disheartened if yours hasn’t been mentioned.

If your story for this month isn’t listed in the above three, you are welcome to do whatever you like with your submission hereon in. If your story is listed, it’s possible that it could be placed in the ultimate top ten* which will be published on this website (and on http://www.beaconlit.co.uk) in July so please do not send it elsewhere until after the final results are announced.

If you have requested, and paid for, critique, this will be with you in the next few days if not already.

*

Gareth’s feedback on the stories received this month:

December’s subject was The Fake Santa.

There are many ways to set a story to this theme: in the home, the department store and elsewhere. And writers came up with some novel treatments, while adhering to the truth that, from the child’s point of view, the very idea of Santa, anywhere, is enchanting.

Writers succeeded in conveying the mystery of the man and his world from many angles, and the way children interpret him. One of my favourites concerns a boy named Donald who ungraciously tried to expose the Santa as a fake at a Christmas party. Now who could this writer possibly have had in mind?

It was a good start to this year’s competition, although these were technically December’s entries.

If you thought you were in with a chance, you almost certainly were. It’s been so hard to choose winners. I have had to exclude from my top three several entries which in other months would have sailed in. So please don’t be too disappointed if your story didn’t make it. There wasn’t a poor story here. One or two were outstanding, making this one of the best competitions I have had to judge.

In many cases there is nothing I could possibly add to improve the story, except for some punctuation. People are working hard at descriptions – “there’s madness and mayhem with one piping voice, the party giver’s, shriller than the rest”, is just one example I like.

There’s a delightful story about Grandpa as a Santa, but told slightly obliquely so you have to think about it.

Another is a convincing commentary on the uncomfortable, low-paid lot of the men who do the job of impersonating Santa. Yet another was a neat variation on the Jimmy Boyd “I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus” perennial.

And clever, too. Rearrange the letters a bit, and Santa becomes Satan. Dreadful thought, or intriguing alternative reality?

One writer uses a string of cliches, but while I normally bristle at their use, there are times, such as this, when they can be used to effect. In this case in the voice of someone down on his luck, telling his festive tale in his own voice.

One or two people, or maybe their spellcheckers, slipped in unnecessary apostrophes before the final “s” in plural words. “Over seven’s”, for example. I’m sure it was a mistake. Just be careful when you read through. Especially when the rest of the writing in that particular story is so good.

I’m looking for turns of phrase that stand out. A sequence of words that I’ve never seen before – “underneath all, the black sparkling seams of coal that have paid for these luxuries” – created not recycled, which is one of the best elements of writing.

But this is not essential; I’m happy, too, with the story that is sparse and crispy told, that moves swiftly along.

I was reminded that ideas for stories come from anywhere. One writer based a very pleasing story on a ’Christmas Gift of Coal’ letter from the local mine owner, written just before nationalisation of the coal industry in 1948, found in a junk shop.

*

Although Gareth judges on the impact of the stories and the quality of the writing, it’s always disappointing when there are simple spelling mistakes or even simpler errors that should have been picked up during the editing process. Please do read your stories carefully before submitting and ideally show them to someone you trust for their opinion.

*Should you get through to the longlist of 30 stories (three per month over ten months), it doesn’t necessarily mean that your story won’t be chosen if it slips out of the top ten. No author will appear in the top ten twice so a story that came eleventh (or twelfth, thirteenth…) could be bumped up where there are author duplications.

You can also receive feedback on your story / stories at £5 per story with the optional critique service (given by the judge, Gareth Davies). This option is detailed on the main 500-word Competition page with an option to select critique within the entry form.

N.B. ALL the profits (fees minus PayPal charges) from this competition go to BeaconLit funds for the local libraries. No one involved in the competition charges for their time (including the judge!). Good luck!

Posted in competitions, writing

BeaconLit’s 500-word comp is open for January

Hello everyone. Yes, December’s theme of ‘The Fake Santa’ has closed and January’s is now live. The theme is ‘A New Me’, to be used in any way you would like within the 500-word maximum. Rules, prizes, entry form etc. via https://beaconlitblog.wordpress.com/500-word-competition.

NB. If you have stories ready for future themes, please don’t submit them until the relevant month as the entry will be disqualified with no refund given, and you won’t be able to submit it in the correct month (because we will have seen it). It’s rule number four. 🙂

Posted in competitions, critique, literary festival, writing

BeaconLit Fourth Year 500-word comp Round 4 – Nov 2020 winners announced

We are delighted to announce the top three stories from November’s entries are (in alphabetical order):

  • 1107 Autumn leaves
  • 1101 Songbird
  • 1104 Cherished treasures

The theme for November was ‘Autumn Leaves’. The three top stories will now go through to the final judging and the top ten prize-winning authors (not necessarily the same as the top ten stories as no author can win more than one prize) will be announced at the 2021 BeaconLit literary festival on Saturday 10th July (fingers crossed!). The results will also be listed here and on the main website (link below) and the winners contacted.

There are often more than three stories that could have made the top three but those that did were either closer to the theme or stronger (provoked more of a reaction after reading) so don’t be disheartened if yours hasn’t been mentioned.

If your story for this month isn’t listed in the above three, you are welcome to do whatever you like with your submission hereon in. If your story is listed, it’s possible that it could be placed in the ultimate top ten* which will be published on this website (and on http://www.beaconlit.co.uk) in July so please do not send it elsewhere until after the final results are announced.

If you have requested, and paid for, critique, this will be with you in the next few days if not already.

*

Gareth’s feedback on the stories received this month:

By all means turn your personal experience into a story. It’s the best form of research. There are several this month that suggests to me that the writers felt at first hand the adventure, pain and satisfaction they are communicating in their stories.

But do check for things like unnecessary repetition and tautology: “7 am on the first morning” for example.

And errors such as “laying on the ground”. (Lying). Plenty of guidance on the Internet.

And while repetition of a word in another sentence close by can add emphasis in some instances, the repeated word is usually there because the writer didn’t read closely enough, and would probably have used an alternative if he or she had spotted it.

It’s good to see writers trying out fresh descriptions, similes and treatments. I particularly liked “they rise like a swoop of rooks” in one story.

One person, inspired by a song, told a story from the point of view of a dead lover. Another took the poetic route, and described autumn as a physical being, wearing the colours of the season, issuing her orders to the trees. An interesting, imaginative treatment of autumn.

But it jars when writers don’t check spelling. One writer made an error in the spelling of Alzheimer’s. (I confess I had to check it myself.)  Always worth one more read through. It is a shame (and especially, here, in a well-told story) because my feeling is that when somebody uses this word they often know somebody close to them who has or had the condition.

Another error was a misspelling of WhatsApp. I’m sure lots of us would get it wrong just taking a stab at it, but that’s the only correct spelling, I’m afraid. Do check online. (I allow other spelling variants, because I know writers from North America submit stories.)

*

Although Gareth judges on the impact of the stories and the quality of the writing, it’s always disappointing when there are simple spelling mistakes or even simpler errors that should have been picked up during the editing process. Please do read your stories carefully before submitting and ideally show them to someone you trust for their opinion.

*Should you get through to the longlist of 30 stories (three per month over ten months), it doesn’t necessarily mean that your story won’t be chosen if it slips out of the top ten. No author will appear in the top ten twice so a story that came eleventh (or twelfth, thirteenth…) could be bumped up where there are author duplications.

You can also receive feedback on your story / stories at £5 per story with the optional critique service (given by the judge, Gareth Davies). This option is detailed on the main 500-word Competition page with an option to select critique within the entry form.

N.B. ALL the profits (fees minus PayPal charges) from this competition go to BeaconLit funds for the local libraries. No one involved in the competition charges for their time (including the judge!). Good luck!

Posted in competitions, critique, literary festival, writing

BeaconLit Fourth Year 500-word comp Round 3 – Oct 2020 winners announced

We are delighted to announce the top three stories from October’s entries are (in alphabetical order):

  • Barking mad
  • The Grimshaws
  • Semi-detached

The theme for October was ‘The Terror Next Door’. The three top stories will now go through to the final judging and the top ten prize-winning authors (not necessarily the same as the top ten stories as no author can win more than one prize) will be announced at the 2021 BeaconLit literary festival on Saturday 10th July (fingers crossed!). The results will also be listed here and on the main website (link below) and the winners contacted.

There are often more than three stories that could have made the top three but those that did were either closer to the theme or stronger (provoked more of a reaction after reading) so don’t be disheartened if yours hasn’t been mentioned.

If your story for this month isn’t listed in the above three, you are welcome to do whatever you like with your submission hereon in. If your story is listed, it’s possible that it could be placed in the ultimate top ten* which will be published on this website (and on http://www.beaconlit.co.uk) in July so please do not send it elsewhere until after the final results are announced.

If you have requested, and paid for, critique, this will be with you in the next few days if not already.

*

Gareth’s feedback on the stories received this month:

Neighbours. This is a rich seam, and people have mined it to very good effect.

Some stories are so convincing, written with passion, that I must suppose the writers have had personal experience of unpleasant neighbours.

Some give conventional treatments of the title. Others spin off in quite unexpected directions. But any treatment is fine, and better still if it’s well written, and competently paced and constructed.

And the stories certainly have been that this month.

It’s fine, if you have had that “neighbour experience” yourself. But by all means let your imagination take you to that place too, as others have.

There is one particularly good story I liked about the sadness of the childless couple next door. That scene evokes – from the children’s point of view – the boys singing carols at the spooky house in Dylan Thomas’s “A Child’s Christmas in Wales”.

And a few stories about the people next door actually making physical contact. (They were plausible, because it can be quite easy to get in, particularly through the attic.)

And there is one imaginative story about shape shifting.

One writer ably conveyed the grinding irritation of living with serial carless, inconsiderate families next door.

What is a good way of ending a story? I’ve decided there are many.

Some this month have quite satisfying, reassuring conclusions, where the main character (there is rarely room for more from more than one in a 500 word story) has an issue, thinks of, and works towards, a solution and successfully, even if unexpectedly, implements it in the last paragraph.

Others leave you, the reader, hanging. Both endings are equally valid, happy, unhappy, clear or ambiguous and uncertain. What matters is how you get there, and if it all adds up for the reader.

A few general points:

Avoid cliches, if only because that form of words is not original writing. I and other readers will surely have heard them before.

Try not to repeat the title of something, or a name, in two successive sentences. Why not just “it”, “he” or “she”?

Look closely at punctuation. Do you need that gratuitous comma. And some people might want to use a semi colon, instead of comma.

These are very minor points. But they can blunt the overall effect, in a story of good descriptive writing. It’s worth getting them right. As ever there is plenty of sound advice on the Internet. Or look at a master like John LeCarre (see below). Just read his punctuation for a couple of pages.

I’m pleased that people look for different ways of describing things – just one original description of movement I came across is: “She puddled across the doormat”.

People haven’t forced, or overdone, the descriptive writing this month. My main overall point is: in a 500 word story, do weigh those words carefully.

Look out for wordy phrases. And try to avoid the passive voice – something “being done” to someone. Try to be as crisp as possible, when words are so scarce. It sound better too.

Even if it’s only one word. “Continue” is better than “Continue on”, for example. It’s crisper, more economical. What does “on” actually mean? (Where it doesn’t mean forwards.)

When it’s perfectly clear who is speaking, there’s no need for “he / she said”. And think of making three individual sentences out of a longer sentence with multiple clauses, which can become clumsy.

I recently read John LeCarre’s Agent Running in the Field. It’s just worth reading just to see how a master handles dialogue. And so crisply.

And even when you think you have found every last error in the story, read it again in a few hours. (I found several things people had missed.

*

Although Gareth judges on the impact of the stories and the quality of the writing, it’s always disappointing when there are simple spelling mistakes or even simpler errors that should have been picked up during the editing process. Please do read your stories carefully before submitting and ideally show them to someone you trust for their opinion.

*Should you get through to the longlist of 30 stories (three per month over ten months), it doesn’t necessarily mean that your story won’t be chosen if it slips out of the top ten. No author will appear in the top ten twice so a story that came eleventh (or twelfth, thirteenth…) could be bumped up where there are author duplications.

You can also receive feedback on your story / stories at £5 per story with the optional critique service (given by the judge, Gareth Davies). This option is detailed on the main 500-word Competition page with an option to select critique within the entry form.

N.B. ALL the profits (fees minus PayPal charges) from this competition go to BeaconLit funds for the local libraries. No one involved in the competition charges for their time (including the judge!). Good luck!

Posted in competitions, writing

BeaconLit’s 500-word comp is open for November

Hello everyone. Yes, October’s theme of ‘The Terror Next Door’ has closed and November’s is now live. The theme is ‘Autumn Leaves’, to be used in any way you would like within the 500-word maximum. Rules, prizes, entry form etc. via https://beaconlitblog.wordpress.com/500-word-competition.

NB. If you have stories ready for future themes, please don’t submit them until the relevant month as the entry will be disqualified with no refund given, and you won’t be able to submit it in the correct month (because we will have seen it). It’s rule number four. 🙂

Posted in competitions, critique, literary festival, writing

BeaconLit Fourth Year 500-word comp Round 2 – Sept 2020 winners announced

We are delighted to announce the top three stories from September’s entries are (in alphabetical order):

  • Coffee Break
  • Ultimatums
  • What if there’s another lockdown

The theme for September was ‘When September Ends’. The three top stories will now go through to the final judging and the top ten prize-winning authors (not necessarily the same as the top ten stories as no author can win more than one prize) will be announced at the 2021 BeaconLit literary festival on Saturday 10th July (fingers crossed!). The results will also be listed here and on the main website (link below) and the winners contacted.

There are often more than three stories that could have made the top three but those that did were either closer to the theme or stronger (provoked more of a reaction after reading) so don’t be disheartened if yours hasn’t been mentioned.

If your story for this month isn’t listed in the above three, you are welcome to do whatever you like with your submission hereon in. If your story is listed, it’s possible that it could be placed in the ultimate top ten* which will be published on this website (and on http://www.beaconlit.co.uk) in July so please do not send it elsewhere until after the final results are announced.

If you have requested, and paid for, critique, this will be with you in the next few days.

*

Gareth’s feedback on the stories received this month:

There have been a number of good pandemic stories since April – although can one even use “good” and “pandemic” in the same sentence? – and some writers pursued the theme again this month, either in passing, or addressing the subject full on, featuring people, still scarred and raw, six months after the spring peak. One, full of raw, awkward detail handled it did particularly well.

There are also some nicely-turned relationship stories, which even this reader, who would normally turn away from standard romantic fiction, found interesting. It’s that simple truth: it doesn’t matter what the story is about, provided it is well told and engages the reader.

In some stories I was looking for more inventive scene setting. Not the same old description we have all read hundreds of times. The plots are interesting enough. It’s just those first scene-setting paragraphs lack bite, in some cases.

And why not use the Internet to put names to those delicious cakes on the counter in a cafe, for example?

We know they look delicious – they always do; they are cakes. If we knew they were Pandoro Veronese, or Panettone, or Millefoglie, wouldn’t that add a flourish to the story? (And it tells me, wow, this person has bothered to research everything.)

Do look for something fresh to say about a familiar location or thing, if you can.  The scruffy kitchen has been described millions of times – dirty plates, half full coffee cups etc. One writer here has tried, with some contemporary detail. referring to boxes “unfit for recycling with the stuck on red- tinged cheese and bits of mushroom.” This is a detail of lock down which many of us will recognise.

It’s worth pausing and pondering over a word or a line, and attempting something different. I like things like – “He’s childishly plaintive”, referring to an older man being given instructions by his children.

Repetition of a word is always a problem, particularly when you have 500 words and not enough space to dilute those repeated words, or hide them. So if it’s a word like “waitress”, give her a name when she is introduced – “Hi, I’m Millie, your waitress.” Thereafter she can be Millie, or “the waitress”, or simply “she” when it’s obvious. When there are only two people speaking, you can dispense with “she” or “he said” altogether, when it’s obvious. You save words and you can be less clunky. Some have done this well.

And be careful with the adjectives you use. A waitress described as young and blonde. The fact that she’s blonde contributes absolutely nothing to the story. If she had blue hair, it might have suggested a certain flamboyance, but even then I’m not sure what. Use “blonde” in a longer story, which might help with recognition if the protagonist comes back another day; but when words are so precious, make that one word work harder elsewhere in the story.

Some writers could make their stories flow better by giving some thought to these points.

I wish people wouldn’t be afraid of cutting a long sentence in two, or three, rather than extend it through clause after clause. In the 500 word story confuse the reader with the plot, by all means, but not with a convoluted sentence that he or she has to reread just to get the meaning,

One writer boldly breaks with convention, which is that the story doesn’t have to be 500 words, but will probably not be a great deal less. So if you can tell it in 152 words, as this person does, by all means do so. He or she is making one main point, and another at the end, and it works well enough.

The problem is that by writing short you don’t include imaginative twists and turns which might make the story better, or the colour and description that might further satisfy the reader. On the other hand, with so few words there’s no padding, and the message is strongly conveyed.

One or two small points but they are important. If Zoom, as in online communication, is used in a story, it has to be with a capital “z”. It’s a tradename along with Hoover, and Apple.

Do study the punctuation, and check if you are not sure. There’s an abundance of help sites online. This month I’ve seen commas used where they shouldn’t be, and not used where they would have been a help. It detracts from some good stories.

There is some good descriptive writing. My advice is quit while you are ahead, and don’t add that extra adjective just because it sounds good to you. And, pedantic as it may sound, one writer puts bluebells on a Scottish island. I doubt it. Harebells, maybe? If in doubt, look it up online. There are lots of “true” facts about flowers and birds in a particular location. People do notice these things and silently approve when you get it right.

*

Although Gareth judges on the impact of the stories and the quality of the writing, it’s always disappointing when there are simple spelling mistakes or even simpler errors that should have been picked up during the editing process. Please do read your stories carefully before submitting and ideally show them to someone you trust for their opinion.

*Should you get through to the longlist of 30 stories (three per month over ten months), it doesn’t necessarily mean that your story won’t be chosen if it slips out of the top ten. No author will appear in the top ten twice so a story that came eleventh (or twelfth, thirteenth…) could be bumped up where there are author duplications.

You can also receive feedback on your story / stories at £5 per story with the optional critique service (given by the judge, Gareth Davies). This option is detailed on the main 500-word Competition page with an option to select critique within the entry form.

N.B. ALL the profits (fees minus PayPal charges) from this competition go to BeaconLit funds for the local libraries. No one involved in the competition charges for their time (including the judge!). Good luck!

Posted in competitions, writing

BeaconLit’s 500-word comp is open for October

Hello everyone. Yes, September’s theme of ‘When September Ends’ has closed and October’s is now live. The theme is ‘The Terror Next Door’, to be used in any way you would like within the 500-word maximum. Rules, prizes, entry form etc. via https://beaconlitblog.wordpress.com/500-word-competition.

NB. If you have stories ready for future themes, please don’t submit them until the relevant month as the entry will be disqualified with no refund given, and you won’t be able to submit it in the correct month (because we will have seen it). It’s rule number four. 🙂